Tag Archives: ghost hunting

Seeking Location to Investigate in So. Cal

Hello!  I’ve been traveling a lot and am in the process of getting some videos ready to share with you.  First though, I need your help.  I’m calling on you, ghost story fans to help me find the perfect location to do an extensive investigation on with a small group of people.  Some of them are people you’ve seen in my videos before, some are brand new additions.

We’ll be filming in the Los Angeles area, but if LA and Hollywood are one thing, they are crowded!  If they’re something else, they’re loud!  So, I’m looking to find a location outside of the heart of LA.  A place we could get permission to have the run of the place.  It would be a single night overnight investigation.  I’m looking for a place that is actively and heavily haunted.  It doesn’t have to be a place where people see full apparitions or a place where people get physically confronted, though those would be okay for me too…. Sorry team, but just a place where the activity seems to be interesting and ongoing.  If you have a personal experience there, we might be able to get you even more involved with the project, if you’d like.

Here’s a rough map showing where I’m looking.  The red locations are potentially good target areas where the blue area is likely locations I’d avoid.  So, I’m looking at a pretty big area.  From Hidden Hills to Rancho Cucamonga, from the massive Angeles National Forest to further south than this map shows, really.

socalmap

It can be a private residence, a public place or a company.  We just need permission to conduct this one-night investigation.  We’re not trying to do anything sneaky here.

If you know of a place within a more populated (blue) area, but you think the building is quiet and isolated enough that we could do an investigation without sound contamination, I’d be all for it.  I even have a wish list for places In these areas:

  1. The Hollymont house just north of Hollywood Blvd
  2. Themla Todd’s Café and the house she died in, Castillo del Mar
  3. The Warner Pacific Theatre, one of my favorite buildings in LA, one I’ve never set foot in because it’s been restricted since the earthquake in ’89.  I’d love to get in there and try to make contact with one of the original Warner Brothers.

So, if you have leads on any interesting haunted location in any of the cities listed, please drop me a line with any info you may have, the history, alleged hauntings, if you know who I should contact and, maybe most importantly – if YOU have a personal experience there!

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Haunted Culver City and The Tower of Terror!

In his latest video, Scott Markus takes you inside…

The spooky elevator that inspired the Disney ride The Twilight Zone Tower of Terror (while terrifying Connor Bright)!

The soundstage that once contained the Yellow Brick Road and the backlot where Beetlejuice, Batman, and Gone with the Wind were filmed!

And have you ever wondered if your own house is haunted, but been too afraid to find out? Scott Markus isn’t! Watch his latest video to see the results of the investigation he conducted in his own home!!

Also includes bonus footage of a talented ghost hunting cat!

Be sure to check out more LA Hauntings video on YouTube!

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Review: The Everything Ghost Hunting Book

The Everything Ghost Hunting Book: Tips, tools, and techniques for exploring the supernatural world
By Connor Bright  

This book has been recommended to us may times as THE definitive recourse on paranormal, and we have also had people ask about The Everything Book on our tours. Recently it came up on Amazon as a suggestion and we decided to give it a try.
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“The Everything Ghost Hunting Book” is part of a series, and is similar to the “Idiot’s Guide” or “For Dummies” series. This installment is written by Melissa Martin Ellis, a member of the Rhode Island Paranormal Research Group and a skilled spirit photographer, some examples of her work are peppered throughout the book.

The guide is very useful for groups that already know basic paranormal phenomena. It excelled at teaching investigators how to cover their assets and protect form liability and keeping client interaction professional. The Everything Book includes good questions to ask potential clients and examples of liability wavers, with plenty of ideas for groups to keep in mind when creating their paperwork. Ellis did a great job stressing the importance of proper research and the need for a paper trail, to protect everyone.

When it came to explaining phenomena and theories, The Everything Book fell flat. The paranormal field is huge and everyone has their own theories and methods, the authors way of dealing with this was to advise newbie’s to join an existing group and do as they say. This may sound like a good idea, but it could also lead to confusion and dependency in a world that requires free thought. Consistently a large problem, such as spirit attachment, is brought up only for the reader to hear that the resolution lies in the expertise of a team member. This can be frustrating to people who are trying to expand their knowledge or build a team that can deal with these types of cases.

Sometimes Ellis attempts to explain a large concept with many solutions or answers, with a vague story of someone’s personal experience that will only touch on one extreme instance. Other times she will over explain every nuance of how to deal with something in the field, such as interviewing a client, which is usually left up to a team on a case-by-case basis. She even at times glosses over important phenomena, such as poltergeist phenomena.

Her chapter on protection includes a great description on how to perform a house cleansing, an often overlooked area that can provide a great sense of closure to a client in an uncomfortable situation. Also included is a chapter on the mundane side of investigation, which contains a great guide to safety from the non-paranormal.

Some chapters feel out of place, for example, there’s a description of an EVP session and The Ghost Box in the wrap-up section, instead of in the gear chapter. This was weird and disorienting to us multiple times. The reader must finish the entire book before rushing into the paranormal because information is hidden in every nook and cranny of the book. Ellis puts a great emphasis on organized note taking during investigations, even though her own book on the matter feels convoluted.

Who should read: Teams looking to streamline and organize their existing process, especially those interested in beginning private home investigations.

Who can skip it: Somebody new to the Paranormal that is looking to get a grasp on the basic process and different phenomena.

Click on the book cover to be taken to Amazon!


What you may be missing on Instagram

Did you know we’re on Instagram? If you haven’t been following us, here’s a small sample of some of the fun you’ve been missing. It’s not too late to find us – we are simply LAHauntings over at Instagram! To the left, Scott Markus and Connor Bright take a moment to rest at Hollywood Forever Cemetery.  

 

 

 

 

The perk of working in the film industry is access to places that are off limits. For a few days, I got to work on the haunted backlot of Culver Studios, even working on the soundstage where “Wizard of Oz” was filmed.

@scottmarkus testing out @thebayareaghostbusters ESP skills @sdcc #sdcc #comiccon #ghostbusters

A photo posted by Los Angeles Hauntings (@lahauntings) on Jul 7, 2013 at 6:02pm PDT

Having fun at Comic Con

Next stop Hollywoodland!! Do you know any haunted houses we should check out here?! #hollywood #la #paranormal #ghost

A photo posted by Los Angeles Hauntings (@lahauntings) on Aug 8, 2013 at 2:32pm PDT

Visiting the historic neighborhood of Hollywoodland – the reason the Hollywood sign was constructed in the first place (which also originally read “Hollywoodland”). Above you can see the original stone walls that once held a gate, keeping Hollywoodland exclusive.

Remembering Valentino at Hollywood Forever! #Valentino #hollywoodforever

A photo posted by Los Angeles Hauntings (@lahauntings) on Aug 8, 2013 at 2:41pm PDT

We were present at the annual Rudolph Valentino memorial service, held every August 23rd at Hollywood Forever Cemetery.

Conducting at paranormal investigation at the Cobb estate in Altedena, CA.

Of course, we had to find some horror movie filming locations too! On this day, we found where one of the most memorable scenes from one of the classic horror films of all time was shot. Malibou Lake, deep in the Santa Monica Mountain range played host to 1931’s “Frankenstein,” and much later hosted “The Ring” and “Twin Peaks.” In all, over 100 productions were filmed at Malibou Lake, including “Gone with the Wind,” “The Great Dictator” and “Butch Cassidy and The Sundance Kid.”


A ghost hunter in training / Frank Lloyd Wright

This same letter was sent to fellow ghost hunters/researchers Henry Pena, Dale Kaczmarek and John Cachel

Question: My wife and I have been interested in “ghost hunting” for years.  We have also been researching the subject for years.  We recently broke down and started buying some equipment (no touch infra red thermometer, EMF detector, assorted audio recorders) along with our existing Sony camcorder w/ night vision, digital and analog cameras.  So I assure you this interest is not seasonal.  Now I am starting to reach out to the Chicagoland paranormal community and see what is going on.  Does your club get together often, share info, that kinda stuff?

We have a little tour scheduled for the 22nd of October, kinda for my wife’s birthday on the 21st.  Nothing truly scientific, more for fun, seeing that we have 14 chicagoland spots to hit.  But I truly hope to begin scientific and professional investigations for fun.   We have taken a few popular ghost tours and always came away saying “we can do better”.  These tours always make me feel like a tourist in my own town.

Like I said I am just beginning to reach out to the community and see what is going on outside.

Have you heard of any activity at the Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio in Oak Park IL?  I work in Oak Park and have dealt with the “Home and studio” often.  I think I might get permission for an opportunity to conduct an extensive study in the building.  Look forward to hearing from you. Thanks, Steve

Reply:  There are certainly a lot of drawbacks to bus tours, just the nature of the beast: it’s hard to create an intimate atmosphere.  However, they are great for getting an overview of a bunch of interesting locations that you can then go back to on your own.  It’s like window shopping!  Before you go on  your self-guided tour, please send me your list of locations.  Likely I’ve been to most of them and I may have a good tip to share with you from my experience.

Unlike the others you eMailed, my organization is a production company that does a lot of different work.  It just so happens that we have produced a video and a book/CD-ROM about Chicago ghosts.  I consider myself a ghost researcher rather than hunter (though I respect anyone looking to learn more).  Other than speeches, we do not have events or meetings.  (UPDATE in 2013: We now lead tours and participate in investigations that are open to the public)  Of all of Chicago’s ‘names’ in this field, I would endorse anything Ursula Bielski does.

Not being a ghost hunter I cannot contribute much technical information, however I would say this:  don’t go anywhere without infrared camcorder or analog camera.  There are debates regarding whether or not digital cameras pick anything up.  I’m undecided, but tend to lean away from digital.  Troy Taylor would have most anything you’d want to know on prairieghosts.com.

As for the Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio, I have heard that it was haunted, but that’s all I heard.  We were given that tip too close to the deadline of our book to be able to research it.  Good luck and above all, be safe out there!